San Francisco Is The Worst City For Driving In California (Stay Away From These Most Dangerous Roads)
If you have been driving a car in San Francisco is more dangerous to drive. Involved in a fatal car accident anywhere in San Francisco, contact our lawyers at the Allegiance Law to discuss your options on how to recover damages. Call at 415-404-6395.
Logo 415-404-6395
871 Page StreetSan , Francisco, CA94117
English Español
Do you Have a case? Call Today! 415-404-6395

San Francisco is one of the most dangerous cities for car drivers in the United States, according to a recent report. San Francisco and the rest of Southern California have hot weather year-round, which brings many drivers and pedestrians on the streets at the same time.

And while there is no denial that Californian residents and tourists alike enjoy great weather in the state’s Southern cities, that great weather is part of the reason why three California cities are in the top ten worst cities in the U.S. for driving.

This was the finding by a recent study published on Patch. Our San Francisco fatal car accident attorney at the Allegiance Law, who has personally reviewed the study, was not surprised to see San Francisco as the second worst city for driving in the U.S. Only Detroit, which has the highest pedestrian fatality rate per 100,000 population (6.79), was named the worst city for driving in the country.

Why California cities are so dangerous for drivers

In total, a whopping 17 California cities were included in the list of the worst U.S. cities for car drivers. Los Angeles claimed the ninth spot in the list. Our experienced car accident attorney in San Francisco explains that in addition to hot weather, California being the most populous state in the country is also one of the reasons why it is not the safest state for driving.

After all, the excess number of vehicles on the road at the same time is a disaster waiting to happen. The more people on the road, the more dangerous conditions exist there. The risk of encountering a drunk, distracted, sleepy or clueless driver is enormous if you drive a car in San Francisco or elsewhere in California.

So is selling your car and staying at home 24/7 the only solution to reducing the number of car accidents in California? Well, technically, if there are no cars on the road, then there are no accidents, but we all know that it is not going to happen. So let’s get realistic here.

Stay away from these dangerous roads in San Francisco

One of the many ways (besides following traffic rules and staying alert when driving) to ensure your safety on the road when driving a car in San Francisco and other cities in California is to avoid certain roads that are more dangerous to drive on than others.

Our San Francisco fatal car accident attorney says that U.S. 101, Interstates 80, 880, 280, as well as Highway 1 and 5 in San Francisco have the highest level of hazardous conditions and driving risks. Besides traffic congestion, which is a nightmare during rush hours, such factors as landscape curves, precipices, and lots of construction projects make these roads extremely dangerous.

Not to mention that there are also plenty of distracted drivers constantly texting their wives, husbands, children, coworkers, and that hot chick they met at the bar last night, and talking on the phone. Hot weather can also affect our ability to stay calm, which is why these roads also see many aggressive and reckless drivers. Needless to say, drunk drivers make these roads more dangerous, too (but you can encounter those pretty much anywhere).

While it may be impossible to stay away from these roads completely, do your best to bypass them by finding alternative routes. After all, your safety and the safety of your passengers are at stake. If you have been involved in a car accident anywhere in San Francisco, contact our lawyers at the Allegiance Law to discuss your options on how to recover damages. Call at 415-404-6395 or fill out this contact form for a free case evaluation.

Posted in Fatal Car Accident Attorney San FranciscoTagged